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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Cathedral Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 104 pictures in our Cathedral collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Coventry Cathedral EAW024986

COVENTRY CATHEDRAL. The old Cathedral was destroyed by incendiary bombs on 14 November 1940, with only its spire and outer walls surviving. Seen here from the air in July 1949 the Cathedral is surrounded by empty plots where other buildings were destroyed in the Coventry Blitz. The interior of the Cathedral had been cleared and looks very much as it still does today. A new Cathedral was completed on adjoining land in 1962. Aerofilms Collection (see Links).

© Historic England

Featured Print

Lichfield Cathedral OP08956

Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and St Chad, Lichfield, Staffordshire, c 1860. Francis Bedford (1816-€“94), albumen print. Francis Bedford'€™s photograph, published by Thompson & Co, shows the west front of Lichfield Cathedral. General views of cathedrals and photographs of their architectural details had been popular subjects for pioneer photographers, and they continued to attract attention as the mass market in photography developed. Lichfield Cathedral, one of the smallest in England, had been severely damaged during the Civil War. Significant restoration had been undertaken in the 17th and 18th centuries, and Bedford'€™s view was taken before the west window (between the towers) was remodelled in the late 1860s during Sir George Gilbert Scott'€™s restoration of 1856-€“78.

© Historic England

Featured Print

St Paul's Cathedral RSL01_01_01

St Paul'€™s Cathedral from Southwark Bridge, City of London, 1855-€“9. Unknown photographer, possibly Alfred Rosling (1802-€“82), albumen print. This view of St Paul'€™s Cathedral looming beyond the Thames-side wharves is an albumen print from a wet collodion negative, virtually identical to a calotype photograph by Alfred Rosling taken in 1854. It is possible that Rosling tried to recapture the scene later in the decade using the more up to date process. Alfred Rosling was a timber merchant and one of England'€™s earliest amateur photographers. He was a founder member of the Photographic Society and the Photographic Exchange Club. Rosling moved to Reigate, Surrey in 1859, where Francis Frith was his neighbour and later published many of his photographs.

© Historic England