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Building Housing schemes Gallery

Choose from 57 pictures in our Building Housing schemes collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Ice cream van JLP01_08_071642 Featured Building Housing schemes Image

Ice cream van JLP01_08_071642

Hornchurch Court, Bonsall Street, Hulme, Manchester. A recently completed multi-storey block of Sectra flats in Hulme, probably Hornchurch Court, with a family in the foreground buying from an ice cream van.
Sectra was a French prefabricated steel formwork design for flats which John Laing and Son Ltd acquired the British rights to in 1962. It was a method of using precision made
steel formwork for the placing of structural concrete in tunnel sections in room unit widths and ceiling heights. The units were bolted together in rows on special tracks, with the concrete poured to form the walls and floors in one operation. The formwork was internally heated to accelerate the hardening of the concrete in the mould and the sections were then lifted into position by a tower crane on the construction site.
Hornchurch Court was the first of three multi-storey blocks that Laing built in Hulme for the City of Manchester to replace 5,000 slum houses. The company started working on the site in October 1964 and finished 18 weeks later with the opening taking place on 10th May 1965. The other two blocks were due for completion at seven-week intervals

© Historic England Archive

Formwork construction JLP01_08_073399e Featured Building Housing schemes Image

Formwork construction JLP01_08_073399e

Restell Close, Greenwich,
Greater London. A Sectra block of nurses flats under construction on Restell Close, with the steel formwork in place for the next storey to be built.
This residential block for nurses was one of three 10-storey, H-shaped blocks, built by Laing's Construction Company for the South-East Metropolitan Regional Hospital Board, using the Sectra system. The flats were built on a high point just off Vanbrugh Hill with views over Greenwich, Deptford and the River Thames, providing self-contained flats of three and four rooms for nurses who worked at Greenwich Hospital. The blocks were named Jenner House, Lister House and Norfolk House. In 2007, two of the blocks were demolished and Norfolk House was reclad and subsequently renamed Leamington Court.
Sectra was a French prefabricated steel formwork design for flats which John Laing and Son Ltd acquired the British rights to in 1962. It was a method of using precision made
steel formwork for the placing of structural concrete in tunnel sections in room unit widths and ceiling heights. The units were bolted together in rows on special tracks, with the concrete poured to form the walls and floors in one operation. The formwork was internally heated to accelerate the hardening of the concrete in the mould and the sections were then lifted into position by a tower crane on the construction site

© Historic England Archive

Future Home 2000 JLP01_09_810281 Featured Building Housing schemes Image

Future Home 2000 JLP01_09_810281

Future Home 2000, Coleshill Place, Bradwell Common, Bradwell, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire. An elevated view from a cherry picker of progress at the Future Home 2000 construction site in Milton Keynes.
The Future Home 2000 was built by Super Homes specifically to be featured on the BBC's The Money Programme. It was part of the Milton Keynes Development Corporation's Home World 81 exhibition. 36 show homes were built by 22 companies from around the world for the exhibition, on the theme of energy conservation. The structure features a south facing double height conservatory to make passive solar gains and contains panels for water heating. The building was equipped with a variety of heating and power generation systems and The Money Programme monitored its performance for a year following its sale.
This photograph was used in the July 1981 issue of Team Spirit, the Laing company newsletter

© Historic England Archive