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Work Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 71 pictures in our Work collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Work Print

Woad production, Algarkirk, Lincolnshire NMR02_01_00009

Algarkirk, Lincolnshire. A group of man and women cropping woad and collecting it in large wicker baskets. The earliest woad production in Britain dates from the Iron Age. By the 19th century, cheap production and imports of blue dye from indigo plants in Asia led to the woad industry's decline in Britain. The last commercial woad production in Britain was recorded in 1932 in Lincolnshire. Lantern Slide Collection, undated

© Historic England Archive

Featured Work Print

Comptometer Room, Stratford Cooperative Society 1914 BL22762

STRATFORD CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETY, Maryland Street, Stratford, Greater London. Interior view of the Comptometer Room at Stratford Co-operative Society, showing girls and boys working on model 'E' compometers, manual calculating machines. The comptometer, invented in 1887 by American, Dor Felt, was the first successful manual calculating machine. The children in the photograph could be employed in work, with the school leaving age only being raised to 14 in the Education Act of 1918. Photographed by Harry Bedford Lemere, 1st July 1914

© Historic England

Featured Work Print

Farrier, Woodbastwick, Norfolk AA98_13563

Woodbastwick, Norfolk. Interior of blacksmiths shop. A farrier shoeing a horse. A working horse would need re-shoeing about every five weeks. Here a hot shoe is measured against the horse's hoof, and the farrier can tell by the mark left how much to alter the shoe. However, the post-war campaign to mechanise agriculture meant that within a decade of this picture being taken there were few working farriers left. Photographed by Hallam Ashley, February 1949

© Historic England