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Hallam Ashley Collection (1931-1980) Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 56 pictures in our Hallam Ashley Collection (1931-1980) collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Maltings, Stowmarket MF98_01576_08 Featured Hallam Ashley Collection (1931-1980) Print

Maltings, Stowmarket MF98_01576_08

The Maltings, Station Road, Stowmarket, Suffolk. Interior view. Malt, the first process in the making of beer, is traditionally made in a floor maltings. The grain, usually barley, is first soaked in water in big tanks or steeps and is then spread out at a depth of about 30cm over the malthouse floors. When it begins to sprout it is transferred to a kiln where it is heated to stop it growing. Once nearly every town and village in England had a traditional malthouse: today fewer than ten are still in use. Photographed by Hallam Ashley in September 1970

© Historic England

Disc harrowing, Lincolnshire AA98_09683 Featured Hallam Ashley Collection (1931-1980) Print

Disc harrowing, Lincolnshire AA98_09683

Disc harrowing near Honington, Lincolnshire. The mechanisation of agricultural practices made farming more intensive and productive, although tractors were often used in conjunction with horses rather than instead of them. Here traditional methods rub shoulders with newer technology. In the distance is Normanton Hill, known as the Lincolnshire Cliff. Photographed by Hallam Ashley in October 1940

© Historic England

Netting sheds, Lowestoft AA98_12838 Featured Hallam Ashley Collection (1931-1980) Print

Netting sheds, Lowestoft AA98_12838

Lowestoft, Suffolk. Interior view of stored nets in netting sheds at Shoals Yard. Fishing nets were an essential tool for the fisherman and required considerable maintenance. After each fishing trip, nets had to be laid out to dry and any tears mended. They also had to be washed regularly using a solution traditionally made of oak or birch bark to reduce damage from sea salt. They were then stored in special netting sheds. Photographed by Hallam Ashley in September 1968

© Historic England